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GA Weapons Law

In the state of Georgia, an individual is not mandated to register their handguns. However, if they wish to carry the weapon off their property, then a license is required. A license must be obtained from the county probate court. Carrying a firearm off one's own property without a hunting or concealed carry license can result in a misdemeanor.

Regardless of whether an individual has a license or not, it is illegal to bring a firearm into certain places. It is a misdemeanor to bring a gun to any government building, a school, a church or other place of worship, or a bar. Other places where it is illegal to carry a weapon can be mental health or nuclear power facilities. Firing a weapon while intoxicated or firing on someone's property without their permission is also against the law and can result in a misdemeanor. An individual can be charged with a felony if they give or sell a weapon to a minor. This can result in a fine up to $5000 and 3-5 years in prison. Counterfeiting or altering a carry license is also considered a felony and can come with a jail term of up to five years.

The Georgia Weapons Carry License allows the holder to carry a concealed weapon off their property, meaning their home, their car, or their place of business. An individual does not need the permission of a business owner to bring their weapon inside. If a business has a sign that states "No Firearms" or something of the like, an individual with a carry license can still legally bring their firearm inside, but it is best to respect the wishes of the business. A gun can also be carried to parks and historic areas so long as the individual possesses a license. As long as a place is not off-limits to carry, such as those previously discussed, an individual can have their weapon on them so long as they are abiding by the conditions of their carry license. However, it is illegal to own short barrel rifles or shotguns in the state of Georgia. In addition, it is illegal to own silencers, explosive devices, and machine guns.

By Irina Dmitriyev, Michael Bixon